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Lead Paint Facts

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The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
Department of Public Health
Bureau of Environmental Health Assessment
Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program
56 Roland Street, Suite 100
Boston, MA 02129
(617) 284-8400 / (800) 532-9571

CHILDHOOD LEAD POISONING PREVENTION PROGRAM (CLPPP)

PROPERTY TRANSFER LEAD PAINT NOTIFICATION


Under Massachusetts and federal law, this notification package must be given to prospective purchasers of homes built before 1978. This package must be given in full to meet state and federal requirements. It may be copied, as long as the type size is not made smaller. Every seller and any real estate agent involved in the sale must give this package before the signing of a purchase and sale agreement, a lease with an option to purchase, or, under state law, a memorandum of agreement used in foreclosure sales. Sellers and agents must also tell the prospective purchaser any information they know about lead in the home. They must also give a copy of any lead inspection report, risk assessment report, Letter of Compliance or Letter of Interim Control. This package is for compliance with both state and federal lead notification requirements.

Real estate agents must also tell prospective purchasers that under the state Lead Law, a new owner of a home built before 1978 in which a child under six will live or continue to live must have it either deleaded or brought under interim control within 90 days of taking title. This package includes a check list to certify that the prospective purchaser has been fully notified by the real estate agent. This certification should be filled out and signed by the prospective purchaser before the signing of a purchase and sale agreement, a lease with an option to purchase or a memorandum of agreement used in a foreclosure sale. It should be kept in the real estate agent's files. After getting notice, the prospective purchaser has at least 10 days, or longer if agreed to by the seller and buyer, to have a lead inspection or risk assessment if he or she chooses to have one, except in cases of foreclosure sales. There is no requirement for a lead inspection or risk assessment before a sale. A list of private lead inspectors and risk assessors licensed by the Department of Public Health is attached and can also be found on the Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program’s website at www.state.ma.us/dph/clppp.

Sellers and real estate agents who do not meet these requirements can face a civil penalty of up to $1,000 under state law; a civil penalty of up to $10,000 and possible criminal sanctions under federal law, as well as liability for resulting damages. In addition, a real estate agent who fails to meet these requirements may be liable under the Massachusetts Consumer Protection Act.

The property transfer notification program began in 1988 and has been very successful. It provides information you need to protect your child, or your tenants' child, from lead poisoning. Massachusetts has a tax credit of up to $1,500 for each unit deleaded. There are also a number of grants and no-interest or low-interest loans available for deleading. It's up to you to do your part toward ending lead poisoning.

PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO READ THIS DOCUMENT. LEAD POISONING IS THE NATION'S NUMBER ONE ENVIRONMENTAL DISEASE AFFECTING CHILDREN. DON'T GAMBLE WITH YOUR CHILD'S FUTURE.

CLPPP Form 94-2, 6/30/94, Rev. 2/03